Implementing extended reality (XR) and artificial intelligence (AI) in health professions education in southern Africa

Main Article Content

S Titus

Abstract





Background. The rapid uptake and pace at which digital transformation tools have impacted educational provision in health professions education (HPE) may reshape our teaching and learning practices in southern Africa. This article explores some ideas about the implementation using extended reality (XR) and artificial intelligence (AI) in HPE.


Objectives. The objective of this article is to offer potential uses for implementing XR and AI in HPE in the southern African context.


Methods. This article used a desktop approach to curate some novel ideas regarding the use of XR and AI in HPE.


Results. The outcome of this article presents 10 novel ideas to implement XR and/or AI in the classroom, such as delivery of quality education, personalised learning and simulation and training.


Conclusion. The use of XR and AI may improve training of students, improve patient outcomes, and ensure adequate professional development of staff in HPE.





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Article Details

How to Cite
Implementing extended reality (XR) and artificial intelligence (AI) in health professions education in southern Africa. (2024). African Journal of Health Professions Education, 16(2), e1101. https://doi.org/10.7196/AJHPE.2024.v16i2.1101
Section
Scientific Letter/Short Report
Author Biography

S Titus, Interprofessional Education Unit, University of the Western Cape, Bellville, South Africa; and Centre for Health Professions Education, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, South Africa

Teaching and Learning Specialist
University of the Western Cape
Interprofessional Education Unit
SOUTH AFRICA

How to Cite

Implementing extended reality (XR) and artificial intelligence (AI) in health professions education in southern Africa. (2024). African Journal of Health Professions Education, 16(2), e1101. https://doi.org/10.7196/AJHPE.2024.v16i2.1101

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