COVID‑19 in pregnant women in South Africa: A retrospective review

Authors

  • S Bhoora Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology ,University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital, Johannesburg, South Africa
  • J Zamparini Department of Internal Medicine, University of the Witwatersrand and Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital, Johannesburg, South Africa
  • N Odell Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology ,University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital, Johannesburg, South Africa
  • L Murray Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, University of the Witwatersrand and Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital, Johannesburg, South Africa
  • G Balie Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology ,University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa 2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital, Johannesburg, South Africa
  • N Sanyika Department of Internal Medicine, University of the Witwatersrand and Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital, Johannesburg, South Africa
  • K Mall Department of Internal Medicine, University of the Witwatersrand and Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital, Johannesburg, South Africa
  • T Ramdin Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of the Witwatersrand and Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital, Johannesburg, South Africa
  • A Mahomed Department of Internal Medicine, University of the Witwatersrand and Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital, Johannesburg, South Africa
  • L Chauke Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology ,University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.7196/SAMJ.2022.v112i12.16552

Keywords:

COVID-19, Obstetrics

Abstract

Background. The majority of maternal deaths in South Africa (SA) occur as a result of non-pregnancy-related infections (NPRI). Pregnancy is a known risk factor in severe COVID‑19, increasing the burden of NPRI in SA. In this study, we describe the prevalence, profile and clinical outcomes of pregnant women with COVID‑19 admitted to a tertiary facility.
Objectives. To describe the prevalence, profile and clinical outcomes of pregnant women with COVID‑19 admitted to a tertiary facility in Gauteng, SA.
Methods. We performed a retrospective review of all pregnant women with COVID‑19 admitted to Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg
Academic Hospital between 6 March and 30 August 2020. Data collected included demographics, medical history, obstetric history, clinical findings and laboratory variables. Outcomes assessed were mortality, admission to intensive care unit (ICU), symptomatic v. asymptomatic disease, maternal and fetal outcome and mode of delivery.
Results. A total of 204 pregnant women were included in the study. Of these, 33 (16.2%) women were critically ill, with 21 (10.3%) admitted to the ICU and 3 (1.5%) deaths related to COVID‑19. The median gestational age was 37 weeks and median birthweight 2 940 g. Sixty-seven women (33%) were HIV-positive, in keeping with national statistics regarding HIV in pregnancy. Caesarean section was the most common mode of delivery (n=105, 60%). However, no women underwent caesarean section for indications related to COVID‑19.
Conclusion. COVID‑19-related mortality in our cohort was higher than that seen internationally, likely due to differences in background maternal mortality rates and difficulty in accessing care.

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Published

2022-12-01

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Research

How to Cite

1.
Bhoora S, Zamparini J, Odell N, Murray L, Balie G, Sanyika N, et al. COVID‑19 in pregnant women in South Africa: A retrospective review. S Afr Med J [Internet]. 2022 Dec. 1 [cited 2024 May 19];112(12):911-8. Available from: https://samajournals.co.za/index.php/samj/article/view/543

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